Learning language, learning religion, and learning history are important to taking action in your own cultural integration. Of the three, learning language often requires the most focus.

Children soak up language like sponges. It seems they learn languages with ease and at a much quicker pace than adults do.

The adult memory is often blamed…or the lack thereof. The ability to retain information often slows with age. Moreover, different languages also have different sounds, which are easier to master at a young age, as the mouth is still forming and speech still developing.

However, though it’s a smart idea to become bilingual as a child, some of us don’t have that opportunity. That doesn’t mean that, as adults, we should pass off language learning as “too difficult.” Instead, we must take a leaf out of the child’s playbook and learn a language like children do.

Learning as a Child

An article published by Patricia K. Kuhl in the journal, Mind Brain Education, entitled “Early Language Learning and Literacy: Neuroscience Implications for Education,” indicates that language learning in children is a highly social activity.

“There is evidence that children’s early mastery of language requires learning in a social context,” Kuhl writes. “Research shows that young children rely on what has been called ‘statistical learning,’ a form of implicit learning that occurs as children interact in the world, to acquire the language spoken in their culture. However, new data also indicate that children require a social setting and social interaction with another human being to trigger their computations skills to learn from exposure to language.”

Believe it or not, this is the same thing adults need in order to learn a language quickly: a social setting and social interaction. Even more so, we need the confidence that a child does, and the willingness to make mistakes.

This is the science behind learning a second language. Do these rules really apply to adults, as well?

Learning as an Adult

Meet Benny, the Irish polygot. He’s the author of Fluent in 3 Months, and says that although he’s not inherited the so-called “language gene” and isn’t particularly gifted with languages, he’s been able to become fluent in seven languages, simply by having the confidence to speak.

Benny met a man in Spain who changed his life. In his own words: “He explained that to speak a language, you’ve just got to start speaking it. There’s no magic, he said. You only need a willingness to make mistakes.”

Think about that. This is actually the secret to learning anything. Consider anything you were passionate about learning in life, whether it was riding your bike, mastering an instrument, or playing a sport. Weren’t you willing enough to just give it a go, even if you weren’t that confident in your abilities?

The self-described “fun-loving Irish guy and full-time globe trotter” has taught thousands of language learners his approach to becoming competent in a language quickly.

“My mission in life is giving people permission to make mistakes,” he says on his site. “The more mistakes you make, the faster you become a confident language learner.”

Science and practical application turns up the same results. The equation to language learning, whether young or old, is as simple as confidence + speaking + making mistakes = learning from exposure.

This month, my posts will offer resources, language learning sites, and advice on how to plug into this equation and get rolling on a new language.

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